Tag Archives: renaissance theatre

web_SawyerBrown2018-PhotobyJeffSprang

Arts Resolutions for 2018

By Audra DeLaney

The month of January is wrapping up. For most of us, breaking one of our new year’s resolutions didn’t take too much time. While we hope you stick to your resolutions, no matter how many setbacks you have, we wanted to give you a look into how you can add the arts in Mansfield to your 2018 resolutions, even if it is almost February.

1. Attend an event at the Renaissance Theatre. 

We hit the ground running in 2018. First, we celebrated our 90th Anniversary with multiple events during the week of January 15. In the coming weeks, Renaissance Youth Opera Theatre (RYOT) will perform The Slipper and The Rose on February 3 at 7 PM and February 4 at 3 PM. The Mansfield Symphony Orchestra presents The Planets on February 10 at 8 PM. Finally, Michael Thomas and cast presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame on March 3 and 10 at 8 PM and March 4 and 11 at 230 PM. A schedule for the remaining events of the season can be found on the Event Schedule on our website.

2. Sign your child up for a class at Richland Academy of the Arts 

According to its website, the Richland Academy of the Arts exists to provide quality programming in both arts, education, and development. Richland Academy offers programs in dance, music, visual arts, and theatre. Classes for varying skill levels and ages are offered. Visit the Richland Academy Calendar for more information.

3. Check out the offerings at the Mansfield Playhouse.

The Mansfield Playhouse mission statement states it is building on its legacy of being the second oldest continuously-producing playhouse in Ohio by enriching and educating audiences and volunteers, and reaching beyond the walls of the Playhouse to embrace all elements of the community. Auditions for Say You Tomatoes will be February 27 and 28 with performances on April 27 and 28 as well as May 4, 5, and 6. The Mansfield Playhouse will also be showcasing performances of Disney’s Mulan Jr. Auditions will be held April 10 and 11 with performances on June 8, 9, 15, 16, and 17. For more information such as audition materials, showtimes, and ticket prices visit the shows tab on The Mansfield Playhouse website.

4. Head over to Richland Source After Hours concerts.

Richland Source has made a buzz in the Mansfield community since its founding in 2013. Richland Source may be known for its news reporting, but it is also known for its concert series called Richland Source After Hours. Richland Source After Hours is a monthly concert series held in Idea Works. Local musicians perform original works and covers in front of community members. For more information on show dates and times for this year, visit the Richland Source Facebook page.

5. Stop in to Element of Art’s First Friday event each month. 

Located in the Carrousel District, Element of Art is a nonprofit art gallery that showcases the talents and offerings of professional artists living with developmental disabilities. The space offers gallery for exhibition and sale of artwork as well as working studio space. Element of Art offers a variety of classes and hosts an event on the first Friday of every month for the public. At each event, live music is performed and the public is invited to listen as well as browse the selection of arts pieces for sale. It is an uplifting environment that showcases the diverse talent of Mansfield artists and musicians. For more information on upcoming classes or February’s first Friday event, visit Element of Art Studio / Gallery on Facebook.

Each year, we challenge ourselves on January 1 to break bad habits, build strong relationships and experience life in new ways. Art brings all of these goals together in Mansfield. As well, art teaches us that although we may not be perfect, we are able to learn, grow, give and love in ways we may not think possible. This is not a definite list of all the places in Mansfield that are filled to the brim with creativity, inspiration, and passion. All of the places here who use the arts as a way to connect with the community have one message to share: take care of yourself, even when you take a step backwards, and know that in this community, artists will make you laugh, cry, sing, dance, and enjoy the year you have been given.

Web_Renaissance-Theatre-photo-by-Jeff-Sprang

Thank You for 90 Years

by Colleen Cook

This past weekend, we celebrated the 90th anniversary of the opening of our theatre, but we’re really celebrating this big milestone all season long. The reality is, our history is rich with the legacy of countless people who gave their time, their talents, and their resources to preserve our venue as a vibrant source of arts and culture for future generations.

It’s hard to imagine how many people have sat inside our auditorium, how many have stood upon our stage, how many have volunteered countless hours, or made a sacrificial donation to invest in the arts in Mansfield.  When you talk to lifelong Mansfielders, so many share memories of growing up coming to films at the Ohio, or as they get younger, shows and concerts at the Renaissance. The reality is, this incredible space holds special memories for nearly everyone who has sat in one of its seats.

I’ve been on staff for five years, and while I’ve heard about some incredible shows and seen many more, what I’ve loved is hearing your stories of first dates, proposals, parents and grandparents, and time shared under our magnificent chandelier. The arts and entertainment bring people together – we were created to share stories with the ones we care about, and those are the things that bind the Renaissance/the Ohio to our hearts.

When I bring my own small children into our space, I’m proud to create new memories in this special historic venue with them too. My daughter has seen more live theatre and music in her four short years than I had by the time I graduated high school, and I’m so grateful to have this space in our town to cement a lifelong love for the arts and entertainment.

So, thank you. Thank you for investing, for attending, for volunteering, for committing, and for performing. Thank you for believing that Mansfield deserves great arts and culture. Thank you for the past ninety years, and for the next ninety. We are so grateful.

Renaissance Chandelier Restoration 2015 photo by Jeff Sprang

The Ohio Reborn

by Colleen Cook

Ninety years is more than most people get to enjoy on earth. Mansfield has changed in so many ways over the past 90 years, our world has changed in so many ways, the fact that anything remains the same is nothing short of a miracle.

Yet, here we are in 2018 and Mansfield still flocks to the same beautiful venue for arts and entertainment. The Renaissance Theatre opened as the Ohio Theatre in 1928, and was for many years a popular destination for cinema and traveling acts. By the 1960s and into the 1970s, though, movie palaces declined severely in popularity, and nearly every theatre like the Ohio was victim to the age of television and multiplexes. One-screen movie palaces just couldn’t compete.

Renaissance quite literally means “rebirth,” and the theatre’s name change in 1980 could not have been more apt for the story that followed. In the late 1970s, the theatre had closed following public outrage as it had become a XXX film house.

Around the same time, the Miss Ohio Pageant committee had been searching for a venue large enough to house the pageant and with the capacity to do a television broadcast of the state pageant. The committee came into the space and cleaned it up (I’ve heard from individuals on that committee that it was in a very sorry state at that point).  A local group of community-minded individuals had been working to save the Madison Theatre down the street, and redirected their efforts to the Ohio Theatre.  Philanthropists Fran and Warren Rupp purchased the venue and donated it to the group, renaming it to the Renaissance Theatre.

In the mid-1980s, a $2.25 million capital campaign successfully restored the space and repurposed it as a performing arts center. The restoration was completed by Richland Renovating, the same group who completed the plaster, paint, and silk updates over the past two years at the theatre. A new theatre organ was installed, this time a magnificent Mighty Wurlitzer (the theatre’s original Kimball Organ had been sold off by prior owners), and fixtures from the Leland Hotel and the Sturges Mansion were later integrated into the theatre as well.


Celebrate the 90th Anniversary of the theatre with us at our 90th Anniversary Weekend – learn more here.

Celebrating 90 Years of Growth

As we mentioned last week, we’re in the midst of an Annual Fund Campaign, which you can participate in here. This year, our goal is to raise $110,000, and we’ve already secured $45,000 in matching gifts to help us get there together.

2018 marks our theatre’s 90th Anniversary since opening in a blizzard in January 1928. We treasure these 90 years as Mansfield’s home for outstanding arts and entertainment, and look forward to celebrating them with you throughout our 90th Anniversary Weekend.

Why We need donations

Why We Need Donations: Annual Fund Campaign

by Sandi Arnold, Director of Development

Having discovered a passion for working with non-profit organizations in the last five years, I am glad to be one of the newest staff members of the Renaissance Team.  Though I had experience performing in a county-wide symphonic band during my high school years, I am not a performing artist.  My work for the Renaissance revolves around building relationships with existing and new business sponsors, foundations, and community supporters.  At this time each year, we hold our Annual Fund Campaign to raise funding from our community supporters.

Why does the Renaissance need to raise money when people buy tickets to our performances?  It may be hard to believe, but ticket prices only cover about 30% of our costs to keep the Renaissance’s doors open. We’re grateful to have so many generous foundations, businesses and individuals who contribute to the organization every year who help bridge that financial gap. Without this financial support, the Renaissance would have to significantly increase our ticket prices.

The Renaissance is the cornerstone of our regional arts and cultural community.  Several dedicated volunteers and staff work behind the scenes to ensure the Renaissance remains a vibrant cultural center in the heart of Downtown Mansfield.   We are here to serve the community by providing quality live performances, and to help generate many fond and lasting memories for our patrons in this historic venue. This is a goal we cannot accomplish alone. We need your help.  

This year, the Renaissance has two matching funds for the Annual Fund Campaign. The Renaissance is grateful to be partnering with the Richard and Arline Landers Foundation, which will match up to $25,000 of community contributions.  In addition, Sharon Granter, in memory of her late husband Don,  will provide matching funds of $20,000 for the campaign. What that means is the Renaissance has between now and December 31, 2017 to raise an additional $45,000 or more so we can receive both of the matching grants. So, for every dollar someone gives, the Renaissance will receive an additional $2 — the value of your donation will be tripled with these matching grants!

Making a donation is easy, and there are 4 ways!  You can visit our website www.mansfieldtickets.com/give and make a secure contribution through PayPal. Or, you can visit or call the Box Office at (419)522-2726, Tuesday through Friday from 12-5 PM and we will assist you.  You can also mail your donation to the Renaissance, Post Office Box 789, Mansfield, Ohio 44901.

Thanks for supporting the 2017 Annual Fund Campaign for the Renaissance Performing Arts Association!

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Careers in the Arts: Arts Administration

by Colleen Cook

Arts Administration (also called “arts management”) is a diverse field of employment in the arts, with a broad range of jobs and workplaces. An arts administrator is a business-minded leader of an arts and cultural organization/festival/institution. Degree programs in the field of Arts Administration have been available in higher education since the 1970s, and focus on elements of business administration, non-profit administration, advocacy, fund development, marketing, arts law, along with other elements of the arts and cultural industry.

At the Renaissance, we employee arts administrators in the departments of fund development, marketing, executive leadership, bookings, box office, finance, and direction. Many of our staff have experience in both the arts and business, and some of our staff members hold degrees specific to arts management. Successful arts administrators possess a dual understanding of what it takes to make great art, alongside what is required to run a viable business.

I’ve had the opportunity to work in roles in both marketing and development at the Renaissance, as well as some positions and internships at institutions of higher education and non-profit arts advocacy. Before entering the field of arts administration, I studied music education and worked as a voice teacher and vocal music teacher in the public schools. In my experience, it has been especially helpful to be familiar with the composers, artists, shows, and elements that come together to perform a show so that I can communicate that story with our patrons, donors, and community at large.

An arts administrator needs to be organized, a self-starter, hard-working, and passionate about the arts to be successful, in my opinion. While the field is broad, many arts administrators are responsible for multiple job roles, particularly at smaller organizations. There’s always more that you can do to support a performance or exhibit, and being on top of your workload is key. In my specific roles in marketing and fund development, great communication skills are essential as well.

If you boil down my job as Director of Marketing to just one phrase, it would be “communicate with the audience about the organization and its programs.” In my previous role as Director of Development, that phrase would be, “communicate with donors and potential donors about the organization’s programs and opportunities to give.” We communicate through dozens of channels, in an effort to reach each individual in a meaningful way that is comfortable for them.

All of our arts administrators have to be great communicators, but often for different reasons. Our executive leaders (for us, that’s our President and CEO, Artistic Director and our Executive Director) need to be effective communicators with the staff, board, volunteers, and artists to ensure that the organization runs well, that the performances are successful, and that everyone stays on the same page.

Our Box Office and Front of House team need to be great customer service representatives, helping to communicate with the audience directly at the point of purchase and at our events, or when a problem arises. Our Bookings Manager must be able to negotiate and communicate with agents and with our artistic and technical staff to land on contracts that are reasonable for our team, profitable for our organization, and bookings that are attractive to our audience. Our Finance team needs to be detail-oriented and communicative with the staff and board about the financial position of the organization so that we are sustainable in the achievement of our vision and mission.

Interestingly, great communication skills make a great arts administrator, as well as a great artist. In my opinion, it’s one of the things that makes working in this field so much fun, and the people who work in it so fantastic.

Maddie Beer Sister Act - Photo by Jeff Sprang

Pro-Tips for Auditioning for Theatre

by Colleen Cook

At the Renaissance, we frequently have auditions running for upcoming productions. The audition is a critical moment for any performer, because it’s your chance to show your best self and potentially secure the part of your dreams. For our casting teams, auditions are challenging because so many talented individuals show up and perform well, and many factors (age, look, personality, etc.) all go into the final casting decision.

If you’re curious what auditions are upcoming, we keep all of our audition information current on our website, and we also post our cast lists there as well; we also try to keep our social media audience informed on our Facebook page. Each type of production has a slightly different process for auditioning: some register for specific time slots and specify what they’d like to hear and see, others offer an open process where there is more flexibility. When in doubt, follow directions and be flexible in the moment!

Our artistic team has offered up some pro-tips for having a better audition. Here are our top tips, and a few things to avoid:

Tips:

“Be prepared, flexible, respectful, focused and friendly. The auditors take notice of you the second you walk into the room, so be self-assured but not arrogant. Roll with the punches and do what is ask of you to the best of your ability without apologizing or making excuses. Producers and casting agents know that big egos cause big problems. Act like a professional, don’t tell them you’re a professional.” – Michael Thomas

 

“Be pleasant throughout the audition process. We watch you, and try to engage with you, from the moment we first meet you. If we sense a challenging attitude, it may not matter how well you audition. As directors, we need to know that you are willing to work WITH us; and that we can successfully communicate with you.” – Dauphne Maloney

 

“When approaching an audition, and while in the audition process, fully commit to everything you’re asked to do!  If you’re asked to read for a role that doesn’t interest you, do it anyway. Still apply yourself; use your training, skills, and experience to show us the best of what you’ve got (don’t try to “throw,” or sway an audition by downplaying your ability to audition well in ANY role.)” – Dauphne Maloney

 

“If it’s a musical audition, have several varying selections prepared. The auditors may not like your choice and may want to hear something different. Have your music clearly marked and in a three ring binder. No accordion/taped-together mess that flows over both ends of the piano. No loose sheets. If your music is a Xerox copy, make sure the music is printed on both sides, so there are less page turns. Clearly mark where you’re beginning and ending, taking liberties with tempo, pauses, ritards, etc. If there is a coda or you’re going back to a certain part of the music, print that sheet out again so your accompanist doesn’t have to flip through the pages to find the right spot.” – Michael Thomas

 

“Don’t audition unless you’re willing to accept any role.” – Lori Turner

 

“Come in the room and make us believe that whatever you do is what you meant to do.” – Kelly Knowlton

 

“Be familiar with the show and the composer, and select audition material that is aligned with that show/role/composer’s style.” – Lori Turner

 

“Be clear, concise and friendly to the pianist – even if they mangle the accompaniment to your song. Soldier on as best you can. The auditors know it’s not your fault, you don’t need to point it out.” – Michael Thomas

 

 

Pet Peeves/Things to Avoid:

 

“Worst for me is when someone comes in the room and is apologetic or making excuses for their performance.” – Kelly Knowlton

 

“Don’t bombard the auditors with excuses – such as: you’ve recently had a bad cold, you’re nervous, you haven’t had time to adequately prepare, etc.” – Michael Thomas

 

“Starting off your audition by telling me the reason you may not sing your best that day.” – Lori Turner

 

…sensing a theme here???

 

“When someone is unprepared or underprepared, without having music explicitly marked for the accompanist, and copping an attitude when things don’t go perfectly.” – Kelly Knowlton

 

“When a performer auditions with the wrong style of music for the show they’re auditioning for.” – Lori Turner

 

“Don’t overstay your welcome or try to be hilarious.” – Michael Thomas

 

“Children choosing to sing songs which are inappropriate for their playable age; for example: “I Dreamed a Dream, ” from Les Miserables–sung by a seven-year-old. A more appropriate choice for/from that show would be “Castle on a Cloud.” – Dauphne Maloney

Ideas for Empty Nesters Renaissance

Empty Nesting? Three Activities to Occupy Your Free Time

by Colleen Cook

Last week, our President and CEO Mike Miller took his youngest daughter to move into college for the first time. As a mother of tiny people (my kids are under 4 years old), that moment seems very far off, and yet I’m alarmed at how quickly it comes. When I started at the Renaissance, Mike’s daughter Jessica was a middle school student, so it hardly seems possible enough time has passed for her to move into her college dorm.

Perhaps you’re in the same boat as the Millers, empty nesting for the first time with a remarkably open calendar for the first time in two decades. No longer are you tied to the local school sports and music calendar – the band concerts, the soccer games, and carting your people to countless practices and events is all in the rearview mirror. While that’s undoubtedly met with mixed emotions (I can only imagine the wreck I will be as we pull away from our kiddos for the first time, good heavens), it can be invigorating to do what you want to do in your free time for the first time since you brought these people into the world.

Here are our suggestions on three new things to put into your calendar that you probably weren’t doing during the high school years:

1. Get more involved in the community.

How many fun, purposeful, social, philanthropic, and community-oriented events have you said no to in the past decade because you needed to keep your evenings open (or they were already booked up by family things)? Now’s the time to go to the Business After Hours, the Coffee Talks, the Book Readings, the lectures, the local meet-ups. These first years of being a parent of college students is the perfect opportunity to make some new friends, volunteer, and rediscover your interests and your purpose. Join a book club or an affinity group (like our new Symphony Chug, symphonic music meet-up), volunteer at a local non-profit, or be a part of a committee working to make an impact on the community – now’s your moment!

2. Go on dates.

Whether you’re happily married or happily single, you’re free again to go out and enjoy the nightlife in your town. Whether you’re coming to a show or a concert at the Renaissance, or taking advantage of the Wine and Ale Trail, or simply just spending an evening downtown, your time is yours again and you’re free to stay out late with no worries about getting everyone up and out the door in the morning.

3. Take up a new hobby.

Become a master gardener, learn to knit, take an art class, or learn to use that DSLR you bought and still shoot on automatic mode. Refining your skills not only expands your world, it’s a great way to make some new friends (that aren’t only parents of your children’s friends) and explore parts of yourself that have been lying dormant for years.

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What is Operation Bridge Building?

By Audra DeLaney

A couple of fall mornings each year, something magical happens at the Renaissance Theatre. School buses begin to pull into the parking lot and as soon as they are parked, children get off with their teachers and get in line to come inside. They have all arrived to participate in an program put on by the Renaissance Education Department called Operation Bridge Building.

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Operation Bridge Building started in 2008 and is the Mansfield Symphony Orchestra’s major education initiative for local schools. The program is designed to both enhance K-5 classroom courses, as well as support the music education for those in public or private school and those who are home schooled in Richland county and surrounding counties. To help prepare students to attend the Operation Bridge Building full-scale symphony concerts here at the Renaissance, we provide them with study guides that go over the music the students will hear and show them how to be good audience members. As well, small groups of Mansfield Symphony Orchestra members visit schools to put on more intimate concerts for the students. Operation Bridge Building serves well over 7,000 local students annually through the full-scale symphony concerts in the theatre and the in-school chamber concerts.

Director of Operations/Education Manager Chelsie Thompson said that each year the schedule for the full-scale symphony concerts is pretty much the same.

“Musicians start to arrive at 8:45 AM, school buses start to arrive by 9:15 AM. We have about 8-10 volunteers and staff that run between the parking lot and building to get students into their seats. Some volunteers meet the buses and lead them up to the doors, others wait at the doors and take the kids from there into the theatre,” Chelsie said. “The first concert begins at 9:45 AM and lasts between 35-45 minutes depending on the age group of the students. We release the kids by school and they head out to buses, so the theatre feels really quiet all of a sudden. In between concerts, the musicians take a break – they might grab a cup of coffee, have meetings or rehearse, practice their parts, or just read a book. The next group of students starts to arrive around 11:15 AM and we do it all over again for the 11:45 AM concert.”

Last year, ten school districts sent a total of sixteen schools to participate in the full-scale symphony concerts here at the Ren. An additional seven districts, a total of thirteen schools, participated in this initiative through our in-school chamber concerts. All in all, we were able to serve 29 schools across 17 districts in 2016.

Chelsie said the performances that happen in a school rather than in the theatre are designed to be a little bit more personal.

“We have a very well-established brass trio, woodwind trio, and string quartet,” Chelsie said. “Each group has a unique, varied repertoire and script that they use for these 45-minute concerts, covering everything from classical to pop to traditional folk music.”

The full-scale symphony concerts preformed here at the Renaissance are designed to expose children to a wide variety of instruments, as well as using music to tie in state standards.

“Our main education concerts here at the Ren are tied to core curriculum standards, often literacy, math, or social studies, and these are a great opportunity to reinforce the material that students are learning in the classroom as well as take students on an exciting arts field trip,” Chelsie said.

Altogether, Operation Bridge Building engages students and teachers alike by providing high quality symphonic programming and a curriculum that integrates the arts with academics.

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The Operation Bridge Building program is underwritten so that schools may participate free of charge. Without community support, schools would have to pay upwards of $4 per student to participate in this program. As a result of not charging for schools to participate, they save a combined $25,000 each year. Our concert schedule fills up very quickly, so we highly encourage interested schools to contact us early.

This year, the Operation Bridge Building concert here at the Renaissance Theatre will take place on October 19 at 9:45 AM and 11:45 AM and October 20 at 9:45 AM. and 11:45 AM. If you or your school would like to learn more about Operation Bridge Building, please contact Chelsie Thompson at chelsie@mansfieldtickets.com or 419-522-2726 ext. 251.

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Intern Where The Popcorn Is: What It Is Like To Spend A Summer At The Ren!

By Audra DeLaney

Staff meetings. Social media scheduling. Blog writing. Brain storming sessions.

There are a number of things that happen during a day at the Renaissance Theatre for the Marketing and Development Intern. My name is Audra DeLaney and I am a third year public relations major and political science minor at Bowling Green State University. I have had the pleasure of interning under Colleen Cook this summer. I have an interest in working in arts advocacy after I graduate from college, so my summer at the Renaissance was a wonderful learning experience.

I found out about this internship back in the spring of 2016 after I got home from a spring break trip to New York City. I quickly fixed up my resume and decided to apply. I did not get the internship that summer but I stayed in contact with those at the Renaissance. I applied again this spring hoping to become the intern and the rest is history!

My responsibilities varied day-to-day during my internship. As my title states, I was a part of two departments at the Renaissance. In the Marketing Department I was responsible for scheduling social media, writing blogs/a blog series on the Renaissance Education Department, filling out event calendars, creating an Instagram strategy document, and doing a few other small projects. In the Development Department, I entered donor and member information into our system, filed donor and member paperwork, went to development committee meetings, attended board meetings, and created a document that holds ideas for the Annual Fund Campaign.

My favorite part of interning this summer was working with the Renaissance staff. Each staff member brings a new perspective to discussions and decision making. As well, they each have hidden talents! The Marketing Director is a singer, the Graphic Designer can play the violin, the Director of Operations got her undergraduate degree in horn performance, the list goes on and on. From impromptu pizza parties to coffee runs the Renaissance has felt like home since the day my internship began.

My advice to anyone wanting to intern in marketing or development for an arts organization/a nonprofit is to be willing and ready to soak up as much information as possible during your internship. The people mentoring you have stories and pieces of the advice they will share with you that will serve you well throughout your career, so listen!

I was not the only intern at the Renaissance this summer. Production Intern/Assistant Director Andy Blubaugh worked with President & CEO Mike Miller, Guest Director Kris Kyer, the Renaissance tech crew, and the whole cast of our most recent musical, The Little Mermaid. Andy is a second year theatre management and visual arts double major at Kent State University. She heard about the internship from Mike Miller after she talked with him about her interest in directing theatre.

“He mentioned the internship and it sounded like a great opportunity,” Andy said. “So I knew immediately it was something I wanted to apply for.”

Andy said her responsibilities changed daily.

“If I was not working on constructing and painting props, I was sending out backing tracks to the cast so they could rehearse at home, or I was talking to Kris about what we needed to accomplish for the day,” Andy said. “I would take notes and cue tracks and sound effects during rehearsals, take t-shirt orders, and help with the odds and ends that needed to be taken care of.”

She also said that her hours varied based on what was going on at the theatre each week and that she thoroughly enjoyed her time interning at the Renaissance.

“My favorite part was getting to learn so much about production that I never had the chance to be involved in before. Especially in making giant fish puppets, working with Cue Lab, and figuring out how to be best organized among a cast of 35,” Andy said. “Watching Kris work was awesome as well. I got to sit in on a few of his coaching sessions with some of our actors, and it showed me a lot about the communication of the director to the actor, and then translating that into their character. Being a part of this show really opened some doors for me to be involved with more parts of theatre than has ever been available to me before.”

Andy felt supported by other members of the staff of the Renaissance and the cast of The Little Mermaid. One of Andy’s biggest projects this summer was working on props for The Little Mermaid. When they were unveiled to the cast, they thought they were wonderful.

“As an artist and as the assistant director, it felt like my work was really appreciated, which made the whole experience so much more fulfilling,” Andy said.

Andy has a piece of advice for those wanting to intern in the production area of performing arts.

“Try lighting, sound, costumes and makeup, audition to be onstage, and offer your assistance to a production in whatever way you can. Every opportunity gives you the chance to learn something more, which can only better prepare you.”


Andy and I would like to say thank you to those who mentored us during our time at the Renaissance. We wish everyone a fun and successful 2017-2018 season!